Podland News

It's all about the numbers! Google 100m, Amazon 1.5bn, Podcast Index 2.7m plus interviews with Juliana Meyer CEO Supapass and Elsie Escobar Libsyn.

April 15, 2021 James Cridland, Sam Sethi Season 1 Episode 20
Podland News
It's all about the numbers! Google 100m, Amazon 1.5bn, Podcast Index 2.7m plus interviews with Juliana Meyer CEO Supapass and Elsie Escobar Libsyn.
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Join Sam Sethi and Matt Deegan on this week's jam packed & informative show

INTERVIEWS:

 - Elsie Escobar - Libsyn talking about Libsyn 5 beta 1

 - Juliana Meyer - Supapass - one website and app for your content, community and paywall.

NEWS

 - Google Podcasts has hit 100m installations on Android.

 - Amazon Podcasts launched to more than 1.5bn potential listeners in France, Italy, Spain and India.

 - Libsyn has acquired Glow, Inc

 - VOX Media buys Cafe Studios

 - Podcast Index now has 2.7m shows in its index

 - PLINK has switched to using Podcast Index 

 - Poductivity, a method of offering interaction and engagement for podcasts, has launched an early alpha

 - Buzzsprout now has 100,000 active podcasts

 - Facebook is testing Hotline, a Clubhouse-like service 

 - RØDE Microphones has released RØDE Connect

 - Patreon has raised $155m in a new funding round

EVENTS

 - Podcast Day 24 - www.podcastday24.com

 - She Podcasts - October 14th - 17th - www.shepodcasts.com

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James:

Welcome to Podland. Podland sponsored by Buzzsprout the easiest way to host, promote and track your Podcast therapist brown.com. It's Thursday, April the 15th, 2021. I'm James Cridland, the editor of pod news here in Australia,

Sam:

Lauren, Sam Sethi here in the UK.

James:

Podland is a weekly podcast where Sam and I delve deeper into the week's podcasting news. Now the

big

Sam:

stories this week seem to be about the numbers, James, a hundred million, 1.5 billion, 1.3 million, two inch two and a half thousand 2.7 million and 10,000. Do you know what I'm talking

James:

about, Jamie? yes. Okay. but only because I couldn't read the script, why don't you start with one of those a hundred

Sam:

million, a hundred years. James Google Podcast is hit a hundred million installations on Android since November is. Doubled its installations and added support for subscribing by RSS feeds. It's the number three Podcast app, according to Libsyn and Buzzsprout. And it's due to launch personalized episode recommendations at some stage this week. surprisingly though, it's not a standard install on new Android phones. So is this. Good news is Google finally waking up to podcasting.

James:

It is good news. Really nice to see Google doing so well. They're actually launching their personalized episode recommendations next week. I'm now telled. so that will launch slowly during next week and be up to a hundred percent of everybody by the end of next week. And that's pretty good because you'll be able to finally get rid of Joe Rogan and things like that from your podcast app, if you want to. But the fact that they've reached a hundred million installations is pretty big. then the next closest are Podcast addicts, which has 10 million, I think in box. They're not, they're nowhere near as large. When you look at some of the data, which is all over the place, you can see that Google Podcast is a pretty standard. Number three in the Podcast listings that said it's number three with about 2.5% of all plays. So it's not massive, but nevertheless, it's a really important bit of the Podcast landscape, I think.

Sam:

Okay. now talking of Podcast players, number three, let's talk about number four. So the number we're going to talk about is 1.5 billion. Amazon Podcast has just launched to more than 1.5 billion potential listeners in France, Italy, Spain, and India. What's going on with Amazon.

James:

So they're slowly expanding. It's nice to see Amazon, which I think up until now has been available in the U S in the UK, Japan and Germany. And they've just added France, Italy and Spain and India. Of course, India has well over a billion people who live there France, Italy, and Spain being rather a lot smaller. Good to see. Amazon continue to grow. One of the things that they've also done is that they've also stuck in a couple of specials in there in Italy. You'll be able to get an exclusive version of Dr. Death in Italian and also bunga, of course, because it's a, the big story about the ex prime minister of of Italy, Silvio, Berlusconi, and they've rather bravely translated that into Italian as well. So that should be pretty good. So they're doing quite a lot of interesting things. The other thing that they've only just announced is Amazon's new headphones, which are Alexa powered. Of course, one of the things you'll be able to do with Alexa. Relatively soon, including these new headphones is you'll be able to say, Alexa, play my followed podcasts and it will play any podcasts that you are currently following on your Amazon podcasts app. that's all very exciting. They haven't launched here in Australia yet though. So I've no idea what Amazon Podcast looks like or how it works, but I'm sure it's very good.

Sam:

I have to say I had a pair of the old Amazon Alexa Podcast, ear buds until my puppy dog at them. So there you go. So I won't be able to tell you either.

James:

Yes.

Sam:

Oh no notes. We will put how you can get also listed if you're interested into the Amazon Podcast. Now you, James had an exclusive story or was it a, just a embargoed story last week that you couldn't announce? What was that story Libsyn?

James:

Yes, it was an embargoed story. It wasn't an exclusive, my goodness. There will be ructions if I say that, but anyway they have acquired a Podcast membership monetization platform called glow for $1.2 million. That was some news, which broke earlier on this week. And that's the third thing that they have bought in the last couple of months. So they bought Podcast production platform, orcs boss. In February. Earlier this month, they acquired an ad company called advertised cast. So they're doing some very clever things here, which is essentially there to continue raising money and earning money for Podcast as advertised cost, making it really easy to sell advertising and sell reads and stuff like that. And now they've got glow, which is essentially a Patrion type of service as well. So quite neat. Announcements from Libsyn. It's interesting to see also interesting, by the way, because in January, the CEO of the company stood up or the president of the company stood up and said that they were absolutely not going to be buying any companies whatsoever. But of course they would say that wouldn't they, but nice to actually see them. I think Libsyn is doing some really interesting stuff right now.

Sam:

And the good news is I actually caught up with Elsie Escobar. Who's one of their community advocates. And I started off by asking her about lip-sync five. And also some of these acquisitions, Oh

Elsie:

my goodness. It's been a long time coming. It's something that the team has been diligently working on for so long. And it's been so hard to just keep it all under wraps whenever you hear folks going, but this isn't there. Or I want this and we're like, wait, it's coming. It's coming. But this is a whole new interface. It has wonderful new, simple episode publishing lovely stats where you can see all kinds of wonderful information. As soon as you get in there to see exactly what you want to see without having to dig through there's new Podcast, page designs, new show, branding, settings, player designs, and then all kinds of lovely settings for destinations. And it's really set to expand with any kind of partnerships or any kind of new destinations or all of those things that are on the horizon.

Sam:

If somebody wants to get involved with the Bita, where

Elsie:

would they go? Definitely sign up for that. By going to five.libsyn.com, get an account and check it out. It's available for everybody for existing lips and users. If you are inside of your account, right at the top, it says. If you want to check out lips and five right at the top of the dashboard and you can click through, and both of those are existing simultaneously, a Twitter or Facebook update their stuff. And then all of a sudden you're like stuck within you interface. And you're like, Oh my God, make it stop. So new people who are signing up for a Libsyn as of now are going to be put into Libsyn five and they'll have accessibility to lips in four, but they are initially into lips in five. And those of folks that are still using lips and four can go check out lips and five. And eventually everything's going to move over to lips and five, all the new features are going to be added over there. Everything's going to be expanded there. But as you mentioned before, it is a beta right now. And therefore there are some things that are not available. And if you do those fancy things that a lips and four has an its whole entire database and a dashboard in there, then you do need to go back to be able to do some of those things.

Sam:

Okay. Now. In terms of timeline, is there a timeline to when the final product will be available?

Elsie:

As of now? No, the team behind the scenes do have meetings with us. They come in and they let us know when things are on the roadmap. So we do know when some things are on the roadmap, but in all honesty, I really don't think that it's really ever going to be in quote finished. And I'm not saying that we're not going to come out of beta because of course we will, but I do feel that there's going to be a sense of constantly the addition of new features and the of refinements and iterations. Even to be a one right now are going to continue to expand. So at first it is just going to be expanding into those core features that everybody uses, particularly those ones that are keeping folks in Libsyn for those are the most important ones to move people to live in five as well.

Sam:

Now, if it ain't broke, don't fix it as the old saying, why starter Libsyn five, if slips and falls working, why move.

Elsie:

Yes. I think it's one of those things where I had a lot of feedback from the industry or from a lot of podcasters that really love the functionality of our product. They really love how all the things work, the episodes are posted, but that look of it or the feel of it. Might've been a little bit on the, I don't know, how would I say it? Old fashioned classic design. Oh gosh. I so love you. Yes. Plastic design. And so now we're moving a little bit more. Yeah. As sleeker cleaner, more modern feel for the things that we have going on in there. And also one of the wonderful things that we have with lips in five and the team has really made it a priority as well, is that there were some things on Libsyn four that were really challenging to implement when it came to new additions too. Things that were coming into the scene, right? Whether it's a new destination or whether it's like a new integration or adding things to the interface, just because of the way that it was built. But with lips and five, since they literally started from scratch to build that entire product, they have the ability to implement these things in a way that's not going to feel like you have to put a bandaid on some things that are not particularly

Sam:

optimal. Okay. So you're talking about new things. Now we had the pleasure of having Rob Greenlee a few weeks back on the podcast. And Rob was talking about the fact that they're working with. Adam Curry and Dave Jones over at the Podcast index and the new namespace and the new tags. Can we expect to see Libsyn five integrating with any of that?

Elsie:

Whenever the foundation of the basic functionality and the things that most folks are really wanting to find, I'm talking basic, I'm talking, making sure that being able to publish your podcast is optimal. Being able to make sure that the everything is stable on the backend being able to Putin cross published to all the places that you want to do, making sure your stats are working. All of those things. Then, after that, I know in the roadmap, there has been communication with the folks over at Podcast 2.0, and I know that it's so exciting for a lot of folks because they're doing some really wonderful, innovative things in there and really expanding the functionality of what we can have with RSS feeds because I'm a huge fan of RSS feeds. And so in that respect, yes, the idea of being able to add these tags is being thought out. And if there is communication about that, and there will be implemented about some of the tags up in the 2.0 a namespace as it starts to expand. But I'm fortunately I don't have a specific date when I can say for you. This is when we'll turn the button and now you can have all the RSSV 2.0 tags. Implemented in, just to clarify, the team is talking. And part of the deal is that we may not necessarily be going on social or anything like that, going, Hey, we had a conversation with and we're working. there are some things that are happening behind the scenes where we have a direct communication and there is a back and forth and there's feedback. And there's all of those things that are lovely and happening back there. Plus we're a little bit busy over there right now. I have to say, in terms of the things that they're working on.

Sam:

So you then are the only one too busy. And your president, Lori Sims has been on the acquisition trail. So you've recently acquired advertise cast for 30 million. You also bought in ox bus in February, and you've been raising some money for some new companies that you might be buying. What's going on there. Tell me, Oh my gosh.

Elsie:

Oh, my gosh. I think Lori has a vision and then we feel it's one of those things where Lipson came around to provide as many opportunities for independent podcasters as possible for the ability, the freedom, which is where it came. That's where the name came from. It's liberated syndication, where the guys that started the company way back when really saw a need to be able to provide the ability for the everyday. Person who had something powerful to say, to be able to publish their stuff and not be like the whole bandwidth thing, the whole, like, where does the file go? Type of thing was really a challenge way back in the beginning. So they stepped into that and were able to provide as much functionality to really give folks what they needed in order to get the stuff out. And as podcasting has grown so much, there are all of these other little bits and pieces. And what's so amazing about the podcasting industry is that there are so many different companies that are solving that one problem, This is the problem that we have here when it comes to recording something on the, in, on your computer, or this is the problem of being able to provide appropriate or a strong sales team for your show, or a glow at.fm was one was, which was one of the acquisitions. There is just another type of infrastructure that provides the opportunity for podcasters to monetize via membership or premium content. And it's primarily all through RSS feed. So it's slightly different than some of the other companies out there that are doing these things. And in that vision, I think slowly but surely to be able to see what the platform can be for Podcast or where they can come into like their home, so to speak, and then they have all the different functionalities there for them. So it makes it a little bit easier in a collective experience to be able to have you as a Podcast or to go. I think I'm ready now to be able to start making money from my podcast and then just make sure that everything is there. Because we didn't know, that was so important when Lipson started way back in the day. And so now being able to build slowly but surely build the foundation of a place where a Podcast can have all the things that they may or may not use, but they're accessible. Therefore them, no, I've been

Sam:

in product marketing before and I've called the Technology escalator. So for many, what you'll see is hosting was the leading edge thing that you provided, but now it's become much more of a commodity across the industry. So with that in mind, I guess you're adding things and functionality, keep the customer with you now, Apple and Spotify look like they're going to be putting out subscription sometime this year. That seems to be the industry gossip. How does that play in? Does Libsyn have any thoughts on that? Do you have any thoughts on that personally,

Elsie:

when it comes to the functionality of being able to add that I'm torn on thinking that it's. Going to happen and I'm torn into the other camp, which is really, you cannot start speculating. There's so much time wasted sometimes when I'm like, stop speculating, just wait until they just release the thing and then you can deal with it when it's okay. I guess that's good. But I think part of it is that I'm not, I guess it might affect people like to me as an adult, mostly an independent podcaster. And when we're talking about she Podcast, like we have built an infrastructure. That is around our product. We have all of these bits and pieces that are generating income and creating and giving us the opportunity to really own all the things that we are. If Spotify comes out with a membership or Apple comes out with a membership for us. And I'm sure that there's many people like us. It's not going to really affect our bottom line at all, because what we offer has been built and continues to be built on platforms that are ours, that we can control, and we can change the pricing at any time. I have no desire to sell an episode of my show. Because I'm not sure that's the thing that I want, but I do have a desire to provide training and to provide zoom calls and to provide like one-on-one mentorship and to provide meetups. And all of those things are not something I want. Now that said, though, I think what it's going to show, there are a lot of folks that are really wanting this for themselves. And then once they do it, it's either going to be, Oh my gosh, this is like the best turnkey. Scenario out there or, Oh my gosh nobody's paying, I have a dollar and it just might feel sad for you. And I have seen that happen in the past. Whenever people start, even with Amira, we just had her on the feed, my other show, and I did a webinar with a mirror as well from glow.fm. And one of the conversations that we constantly keep coming up is that a lot of pod casters feel that once the tool is there, all of a sudden they're going to be rich and famous. And that's really not the case. And oftentimes when I work with podcasters too, I really have to open up the curtains and say, Hey, you're going to possibly get, if you're lucky, you're going to get about 3%, 3% of your audience to go premium. And that's on the good side. So what does that look like for you? And if you have a core audience of a hundred. How much money is that gonna make you month to month in? Is it worth it? And so if you open it up to that kind of, Oh, okay. I see how this works. Then you're able to see whether or not that impact of subscriptions or premium content is really gonna matter for the rest of us because there is the top 1% or the top 10%, and then there's all of the rest. And that's how I speak for

Sam:

good. Now, speaking of that, when I spoke to Jess, things are a little bit less from, in terms of COVID was still hanging around with the vaccine. So she Podcast, when are you going to do the next conference? Have you got a more firmer date now that you can release?

Elsie:

Do I'm going to go look right now? I'm going to quickly give you the right date. Okay. October 14th through the 17th. Wonderful. Oh my gosh. And that is happening in Scottsdale Arizona this year, so that this is a very. It's a podcasting conference that centers on women and nonbinary voices. That doesn't mean that anybody else is not welcome, but that is what this centering is here. So all the speakers are going to be very specific type of speakers that we're putting up on stage and the experience as well. We are really choosing to only sell 500 tickets for that. We're capping it in order for us to be responsible and to make sure that we address as many needs as we can and keeping as much space as possible, but also. The conference itself, came from a need that both Jess and I felt beyond the learning process of going into conferences and getting all the information and maybe the disparity that we saw or have continued to see in a lot of different places where folks taking the stage. Usually it's the same type of folks that are constantly given the keynotes or more room to speak beyond that. We also found that the way that conferences were put together are aligned with a certain type of person, meaning sometimes keynote start at eight or nine in the morning, or get up and do the thing. And then they go all the way into the night and then you're going into parties and everybody's like screaming at each other. And you end up, I know for me, when I come home from a conference I'm exhausted and I have to step into my life home. I don't get a day off. And so this conference is. They are so that you, as the majority of women, at least for me speaking for myself, I need to recharge. So we set the schedule so that we can start maybe at 10 in the morning. And if you want to attend all the learning sessions could for you, but there's going to be also a track that is purely, you can just chill out and hang out with your friends and you just take some time off of your life, whatever that might be so that you can recharge. Because for at least, for us self care is very important and we push so much push. We have to do all the things we've got to get all this stuff done and trying to dismantle that mentality and being able to really address the human being behind the microphone is what's really going to keep the majority of us podcasting and who doesn't want them to just, I don't want them to quit.

Sam:

So where would I be able to get tickets? Give me the URL. She

Elsie:

podcasts.live.

Sam:

Wonderful. Elsie Escobar. Thank you so much for your time and good luck with lips in five and six and seven. I'm sure you'll be there for those as well. And last question, will she Podcast also be always simultaneously cars? Will it be a hybrid event? So are you going to also broadcast it online? We are, hang

Elsie:

on doing some fun things with that. Yes, for sure. There is going to be a component of that. We don't know exactly what that's going to look like, but in my old Sam, we had such a wonderful idea with Jess and I, when we were expanding our brains and do all of this, the possibilities of doing a really innovative thing, not sure if we're going to be able to execute on the dreams and the creativity that bursts out of us, but alas, at some point, I think that the world is as in the cliche. Different. And therefore we have seen that we can, there's a lot of things that we often thought, Oh, I can't do that. Who's going to do that. Nobody's going to sign up for this. Nobody's going to sign up for that or no, it's not going to be the same, having things be virtual. And we've been proven wrong in so many different ways because when the need arises, we gain can be very resourceful. So yes, there will be some kind of a component.

Sam:

I look forward to both of those healthy Escobar. Thank you so much for your time. Speechie soon. Take care. Thank

James:

you. Oh, there's LC from Libsyn. It's always good to get Elsie on. She's a fine person. She's always a very smiley person. When you see a face to face in Podcast conferences. if you can remember back when we were able to go out to conferences and things, she was always very smiley and happy to see me, which is a nice thing. good to

Sam:

hear her. she also noticed obviously the Xi Podcast event is going to be in-person so maybe you can go, James.

James:

the sheet Podcast event may be in person, but even though you can hear a an airplane going overhead there won't be any leaving Australia for me for awhile because we're not allowed. but I'm sure we'll find that an interesting experience later on in the year. I think the first thing that I'll be going to outside of Australia will be Podcast movement evolutions in March of next year. But even that, according to the. Wonderful news from our government this week, even that might not be happening because they're very slow at getting any vaccines. we're not having it bad here, but even it's a little bit frustrating, but anyway, moving on.

Sam:

just thinking, have you returned to convict status? Not allowed to leave the country?

James:

That's pretty well where we are. we're not we have to ask permission to leave the country. We can go to New Zealand. We've got the bubble between us but that's about as far as we go, but we have to apply to the government if we want to leave the country in any other way. And. quite often they turn around and they say, no. so I haven't been to the UK. I haven't had a pint of London pride for the last a year and a half, so it'd be nice to well for the last year. So it'd be nice to eventually be able to jump on a plane again. I am though going to book a airplane ticket later on today, which I'm thrilled about cause I'm going into Sydney in June. That will be an exciting, the first time out of Queensland for a year. so that should be an exciting time.

Sam:

Good. Just so everyone knows. Why are you going to Sydney?

James:

Why am I going to Sydney? I can't actually say yet. yes, maybe I won't. Yes. maybe at some point in the future, I will be able to spill the beans on that.

Sam:

Now, one of the stories you covered this week was about Vox media is buying cafe studios, which was founded by the former us attorney Preet Bahara and his brother. Vinet a publishers as a slate of shows, including stay tuned with Preet. No terms were given. Is this a good acquisition for Fox media?

James:

I think it's a clever. Acquisition, Preet is clearly a man with an awful lot of helpful connections in terms of politics. Cafe produces a ton of shows, which are all about politics and that sort of thing. And I think it's a clever way of bolstering up some of the editorial in there. Podcast networks. I think that's that's a bright move and it'll be interesting, obviously seeing what plans they have to to increase some of the shows that are coming out of cafe or indeed Vox as it will be now. And to see what happens there

Sam:

now, back to the numbers I'm excited by numbers this week. It seems Podcast index has reported that it now has 2.7 million shows in its index. And that's more shows than that listed in apples Podcast. It turns out how's that

James:

possible. Yes. how it's possible is, and this is story that I've been working on over the last week is it turns out that there are lots of podcasts out there that aren't in Apple podcasts. And if you look particularly in mainland Europe if you remember being part of that Sethi I see when you look into into other parts of Europe, you will see an awful lot of people who simply don't care about Apple. in terms of their Podcast, because if you have a look at the amount of Apple phones is, 20%, 10%, it's not very large. And so therefore why would they care? it turns out that if you have a look through all of the Podcast, which are available out there, then, I have been thinking. In my very, UK, us Australian focused way that Apple podcasts is the source of truth. It's the list of podcasts. And if you're not in Apple podcasts, so you're not a Podcast that really isn't true. And in fact there was a big Podcast company that I was talking to a couple of days ago who say that they've got about 60% of their podcasts are in Spotify. And about 50% of their podcasts, only 50% of their podcasts are in Apple podcasts, which is a real eye-opener for me. so, so I thought that was fascinating. And Podcast index is data, which is well, 2.7 million. It's probably even more than that now. having that number so much higher than Apple podcasts is I think quite interesting, just to sort of bear in mind where we are in terms of where the future of podcasting might be. Is it going to be all on Spotify? Is it going to be all on Apple? the answer is probably, no, it probably isn't

Sam:

one of the things that caught my attention though, related to the story about the Podcast index was plink has switched to using the Podcast index as its main source of Podcast data. After a series of outages with the Apple Podcast, API are Apple about to turn it off. James,

James:

I don't know is the quick answer. Apple have a big announcement on the 20th. They've reached out to invite me to a briefing afterwards, which would suggest that there's something about podcasting in that big announcement. I don't know what the plan is, but I have to say. I am a little bit worried at the moment that there are going to be an awful lot of Podcast apps out there who just simply use the Apple iTunes API, who are going to be left high and dry. If Apple wants to turn something off because knowing Apple I'll turn it off pretty fast, as soon as they actually do it, what plink has been doing here is that they have seen as have I an awful lot of problems with the Apple podcasts API with actually getting data out of the Apple podcasts API. It doesn't behave actually particularly reliably. And certainly it doesn't work with the radio France podcasts. For example, there are some geo-targeting stuff that goes on with some of the shows here in Australia as well. So it's quite a worry. I think if people were to, turn around and all of a sudden have to completely rebuild how the Apple podcasts directory works.

Sam:

Wouldn't it be wise that they all start looking at the Podcast index because given what Twitter did many years ago were turning off the API and all the Twitter developers just died overnight. I think Apple will turn it off because how are they going to build subscriptions and make payments? If you can get it free on some other platform, if the index is being broadcast out to all the users, what other

James:

apps? I suppose that there are two things, partially the will be. And I think, this is relatively certain that the will be some sort of paid access to some exclusive podcasts on Apple. We don't know how that's going to work. It's probably my suspicion is it will be a monthly fee. Maybe that'll be included in the Apple mega subscription thing that they also have. I think that's certainly one side of it. I think another side is just that, Apple has been sitting there supplying all of this data to so many people for so long, and I don't suppose that's going to be something that they want to carry on doing forever. so I suppose they've got both of those sides and also to be fair. It's really hard as a podcaster to get your stuff into Apple. You've got to fiddle around with an Apple API, which doesn't always work. You've got to try and log into podcasts connect, which I noticed is looking a little bit different this week for some reason, but Podcast connects. it, wasn't working for a large amount of last week as one side. Apple just works. of course but not in this particular case. so actually from a point of view of getting into Apple, it's actually really difficult and it's very, yeah. Different to getting into, for example, Spotify, which is a much easier thing of just pressing a couple of buttons and away you go. So from that point of view, I worry that Apple. Has just made everything too difficult and too complicated. And you've got to get everything approved by a human being and everything else. And I wonder whether actually people are just going, that's too complicated. I can get into Spotify really easily. I can get listed by these other apps really easily. So why on earth? Wouldn't I end up doing that.

Sam:

Exactly. one of the things that we've been talking about is owning your. Space on the web, certainly as a podcaster being the platform, maybe Spotify or Apple could turn you off, certainly with the Apple podcasts, API that we think could be, or might not be turned off. So I caught up with Juliana Mayer. She's the CEO and founder of super pass, And I asked her about what is super

Juliana:

pass. Super pass is the only one website and app maker for your content, community and paywall. So it's a really easy way to have your own instant Netflix or Spotify type platform for all your content in one place together in a place where you can keep a hundred percent of your money, own the relationship with your audience directly. And it's all yours on your own website.

Sam:

Now I know a little bit about the platform. When I first came to the platform, I thought, Oh, this is pod page, isn't it. So what's the difference between you and pod page.

Juliana:

So I really love what Brendan's doing at pod page. the ways that we're similar is that you can instantly have a beautiful website for your Podcast where it pulls it in through the RSS feed. There's a lot of ways that we're different though in that this is really about all your content together in one place. Or you can have your video courses there. You can sell your audio books. You can have your blogs there. You can have, you can build a community with a membership login or membership paywall. You can have subscriptions, you can have one time purchases. And then the other major difference that we do that not really anyone else is doing is you can have your own mobile apps. So you can have an, a native iOS app and Android app, which again, the user experience, when you can have your native app for streaming, we really aim to make it very much like that Netflix or Spotify type experience. Our mission is to give every create on the planet. The powerful technology that normally is only available to Netflix or Spotify, or even the social media platforms are having to create a Facebook group or rely on YouTube or all these other platforms that are brilliant. They're wonderful for increasing your reach and growing your audience, but then where do you send your. Most dedicated listeners or viewers, where do you send that audience that you really want to turn into super customers? So we're really targeted at Podcast is that are really building a business around their content that typically they aren't just making a podcast that are also creating other things, whether it's video courses or even upselling their consultancy services or anything else that they're doing. and really that's where this comes into play. So instead of, so what's brilliant is having. The Podcast as the top of your funnel. A lot of the wonderful creators we work with have their Podcast at the top of their funnel, that YouTube is the top of their funnel and their social media is the top of their funnel. But then where do you send those super listeners or those super customers? And that's really where we feel that the journey's a little bit broken because then people say, go over here to get my free their lead magnet, whether it's a free ebook or whatever it is to capture their email address so that you can own that relationship. If you've got people listening on Podcast players on social media, you don't own that relationship. We don't have that email address. If that platform kicks you off, which we're seeing happening quite a lot to create as recently, then all of that.

Sam:

let's be honest, Donald Trump isn't to create a certain kick him off.

Juliana:

See, there's really sort of big examples like that, but we're here all the time from creators that there was one the other day where. Their work is around scientific research. And there was some mention of a vaccine on their Facebook page, a group, which they'd spent five years building up with over a hundred thousand users. And literally Facebook deleted the whole thing. They've never been able to speak to a person they've never been able to get back work back. And there's loads of other examples like that, that people come to us all the time saying we're tired of building this on rented land. We want to own our community ourselves. We want to have a place where we can host our content and also, and the revenue. So another thing that a lot of creators do is that they use it to have patron donations and unlike on Patrion or Crimea coffee or any of the other wonderful platforms for doing that. Where you have to have rough share here. There's no rough share. You keep a hundred percent of anything that you earn, because it's all on your own website and in your own mobile apps on the app stores, obviously there's Apple, Google's cut and the Stripe fees, but other than the transaction charges that the platform Supartz is not taking any cut at all. It's all a hundred percent your money. No,

Sam:

this could be quite interesting in terms of timing for you. Apple is about to bring out subscriptions. Spotify is about to bring out subscriptions. People are going to get into a mode of learning how to charge for their Podcast, but then going back to what you just said, they will then have this challenge where what if Apple just kicks them off tomorrow or Spotify kicks them off tomorrow. So do you think that Apple and Spotify having subscriptions will help you because people will get more of an understanding of what that can be? I think

Juliana:

this is a really interesting part of the conversation because we've been around for 10 years and when we started subscriptions were very new. The subscription model in the world has obviously been around a long time, but digital subscriptions for streaming content was very new. Spotify had only just launched in the U S but Netflix was only just starting their streaming. Subscription away from the DVDs. And that's when we started and really the opportunity that I saw. So I was a musician working, running my own label. And I saw that there was this opportunity for Microsoft frictions, where audiences could pay creators directly, a small subscription a month. And that was really the original idea of super and 10 years later, although the product and the nature of the functionality has evolved. And obviously things have moved on quite a lot since then, that initial idea of an audience paying a micro subscription to an audience is still very much the core. And what's wonderful. Now is now it's mainstream for 10 years. We've been talking about. Why it's so important for creators to own that relationship directly and have that opportunity. And we've seen lots of examples of audiences that really do want to support creators in that way. And we started before Patriot, but it's been wonderful to see the rise of patron and the other platforms like that, because it's really validated that there is an enormous opportunity and market here for people to connect directly in that way. And it's interesting what you're saying about what Apple and Spotify are doing, and then a lot of the other big platforms. I think it's wonderful. I think that it's great that there is going to be more opportunity for creators and entrepreneurs to be paid for their work. I think the way that the model with Facebook works, for example, where as a creator, you do all the work, creating the content, you create your. Group or your page. And then you have to pay Facebook to boost your posts so that more than 10% of your followers see what you're posting, but that's crazy. Not only is the content fueling all the engagement on Facebook, but content creators aren't being paid for that they're paying for that opportunity to engage with their followers. I think it's long overdue that creators are sufficiently paid for what they're doing. And I think that if platforms like Spotify and Apple are going to be adding it, that's wonderful opportunity for creators. Give more choice, give creators more choice about how they want to get paid. There's still great opportunities with sponsorship and paid advertising, or even in just upselling their other services, whether that's their video courses or their consultancy. And they want to make everything free. But I think that what will always happen when the platforms own all of that is you're always going to have rough share. You're always not going to have control. You're still not going to know who your audience is. You're still not going to have that email addresses. So what we're doing is we're saying, give creators choice, give your audiences choice. Your audience doesn't have to just pay in one place. They could potentially choose to pay on their own favorite platform. I was listening to your earlier Podcast about that debate of, is it also going to become a walled garden? Is Apple suddenly going to just have some of the podcasts over there and Spotify, some of the podcasts over there. And obviously we're already seeing that happening across the industry in various ways. And I think that will be a real shame. I think the more walled garden it gets, the more frustrated the audiences are going to be an action superpower. It's all about user experience. It's all about looking at that user journey and what can make that as wonderful and. Simple as possible. And I think as soon as you have walled gardens, you break that. So I hope that people become more open, but also create these opportunities to get paid because it is valuable what we're doing and what we're trying to do at super parties. We're trying to work in collaboration with all those platforms. So we work with all the Podcast hosts. We want to work in collaboration with our ecosystem where maybe Apple or Spotify are creating that opportunity to have subscriptions. And we integrate with all the different platforms, whether it's Patrion or discord or your MailChimp or any of that, it's all about what is missing from the ecosystem. And we think that what's missing is the ability to bring all those things together that everybody's doing and have it on something that you own. So if you can bring all of those super listeners or super viewers, they're your top one to 10%. You're not going to get everyone to come to your website. So that's why there's other platforms are still really important. But what we've seen a lot, cause we've worked with not just in podcasting space, we've worked with musicians and TV and film and all these different kinds of industries. And what we're seeing is that what's really lacking is that experience for super fans. And there's too much noise on those platforms. It's too confusing the next and YouTube, the next video that they're shown, isn't your content. It's somebody else's. And so this is an opportunity that when you've got those, that really engaged audience, where do they go? Where do you take them? And we feel that's what's missing. So we want to bring all of that together on your own website, in your own mobile app. So you can compete in user experience with the experience that they're getting from a Netflix or Spotify or all these other platforms, but it's your ecosystem. And it's not instead of it's as well as, and it's not more work because it's the same content you're already creating. It's the same audience you're already building, but you're giving them a place and a home to really drive that connection. When there's clubhouse, the latest trend, everyone's now jumped over there. All this effort is going into clubhouse, which is great because people are building new audiences from clubhouse, but then send those top listeners or whatever a listener on clubhouse is called. I guess it's a listener. You send them to your website. They want to know what we get. It's a member. Send them to your website if they want to know more so that then when the next trench, before it was, tick-tock send your most engaged tiptop viewers there. When YouTube suddenly comes out with the next feature, like with vesicles, whatever's going on, people keep jumping ship to all these different platforms and it's so exhausting. So what we say is do all those things, right? The trend be ahead of the curve, make the most of all those opportunities, but on every single step of that journey, drive people to your own website, your own app, build that mailing list, have people with your own app on their phone so that you can push them and push notifications. Whenever you've got new content, whether it's a new video course, new podcast episode, a new YouTube episode, any of those things, you can get push notification through your super pass powered app that goes straight to them saying, this is what I'm doing. Another nice thing that we also really like to talk about is that call to action on a podcast is really fragmented. You'll say, go over here for my video course, go over here for my lead magnet. Go over there for. My YouTube or my blogger or whatever it is. And what we say is that instead of. Them sending them through this really tacky sales funnel, which everybody knows those tacky sales funnel, where you're trying to get that email address. And then they get emails rather than trying to over time, sell the course instead, just be authentic. Be able to say, if you liked what you heard today, go comment, go to my website. Comment on what you liked. What else do you want to hear? And then as part of commenting, you're getting that email address. So you're not saying give up your email address. You're saying, come join in. And as part of that, they're just naturally giving you their email address. Then you're able to then send them everything else you're doing in a really natural way, because they've opted into being, wanting to be part of that conversation. And of course, you've got the mobile apps. You can do that through push notifications, which is even better than email open rates. And then once they're in the app, they're then seeing, Oh, wow, look, what else they're doing? They've got these video courses and, Oh my gosh, they've got four YouTube channels. And they've got a five Podcast series. And everything that people are doing is all over the show. And it's really hard to find things together and. A lot of the creators that we talk to come to us and say, I'm exhausted of having four different websites, five different, whatever it is. And we just say, brilliant, we'll just pull it all into one place. And it's going to look and feel amazing.

Sam:

Now, one of your clients is the pod Fest conference. Tell us about what you do with

Juliana:

them. So with Podcast, so it's, I guess it's a little bit different to the kind of Podcast scenario that we've just talked about because for them it's really about the recording. So to watch again, app that we've done for them. So all the event recordings, so there's over a thousand conference sessions now that are on their app. They've got their own pod fess app. It's like their own mini Netflix for all of the conference videos. And we've done four conferences with them. We're about to do another one with them in may. So you can go on there. If you bought a ticket. Which included access to the recordings afterwards, you can go in, you automatically get access to that content. It is gated those certain people that haven't bought that kind of ticket can't access that. And when we first started doing this with Podcast, they are tentative or what they were doing was they were using Vimeo and it was a really long list uncurated list. We've got 500 videos, just having one on list. It's not very easy to find what you're doing. They were then sharing the link. Hoping that people didn't pass it on. There was no protection. So what we did was, and it was really fun. Cause we started, we can do this. So instantly in the conference finished on the Friday. On the Monday morning, we started uploading the 500 videos by 2:00 PM. That same day we had already submitted the bills to the app stores for approval and uploaded all the content. So it's really quick. So literally within 24 hours, they had their own Netflix and yes, it's a place. People can comment on videos, watch stuff again that they missed at the conference. And also for Podcast, they can now have a really valuable resource of materials that is curated into the different topics. And you can find the videos all about what equipment to use and the videos all about how to turn your podcast into your YouTube channel, whatever it is, you can really beautifully. Find that content curated a bit like how Netflix is curated and it just makes it a really nice experience. And now Podcast can upsell that material to others that maybe missed the conference that, or maybe didn't buy the ticket at the time. They're like, okay, now I'm ready to learn more. Let's see how I can get access to that. And then it's just instantly there in the Palm of their hand.

Sam:

Brilliant Giuliani. Look, before you go tell everyone how they can get hold of super pals, where do they go?

Juliana:

Cool. Super passes, but with an a, so STPA PA double S and it's literally just super pass.com. We'd love to hear from anyone. I always love driving what we're doing as who've passed by hearing what people want. So if you've heard something today, that's piqued your interest and you want to find out more. Or if you want to give us some feedback or something else that you think maybe we've missed a trick and this something else that we could be looking at next that would really make all the difference to you. We want to hear from you, learn from you and if we can help you, we'd love to.

Sam:

Brilliant Juliana. Thank you so much.

James:

Thank you, Sam Juliana, super pass and super passes. S U P a S super pass. there was a advertiser for Metro radio back in the 1990s called the super screen, which had brilliant jingle, which I should play a little bit of now.

Sam:

Super screen

James:

super straight that to you. No, some of that and that to me that's all I can think about super screen. but clearly that's not what that is. The super pass. Very good to hear. It's interesting hearing so many of these types of services, glow, which of course we were talking about earlier and Patrion and supporting cast who are currently sponsoring pod news member for, all of these services. they're all doing slightly different things. And it's really interesting hearing how they're approaching this particular.

Sam:

Patrion raised 155 million in new funding, The funding values, the company 4 billion and clearly 2021 looks like the year when we start to get into whether it's through Patrion, super pass, Apple, Spotify, but paying

James:

for podcasting. Yes. I think that there's clearly going to be a bit more paying for podcasting, whether it's that way or whether it's through cryptocurrency, of course, as well. because that is growing very quickly as well. Adam Curry posted some numbers earlier on this week, saying that in the first week of April Podcast has received 22,491 payments. I asked him, what does that mean in terms of money? And he told me that's 1.8 million SATs per day. That's thousands of dollars already going to both podcasters, but also Podcast app developers. which is really nice to see. So it's still really difficult and complicated to add the relevant tags to your Podcast, and very difficult to run a lightning node and all of this other weird and wonderful stuff that you end up having to do. there's a guide to how to earn Bitcoin from your podcast on the pod news website, but really interesting seeing how quickly that's now taking off. and I think it's only going to take off faster when there are more simple ways to end up doing that. And

Sam:

on pod news, you've now started to list against certain podcasts, certainly Adams, whether they have support for value for

James:

value indeed. And on this podcast as well. Cause this podcast has support for value, for value as well. So I've been able to incorporate the Podcast indexes API into that so that you can actually see which podcasts you can support in that way.

Sam:

How are we doing James? are we millionaires yet? So Tashi millionaires,

James:

not quite, but we're running around, I don't know, three, 4,000 SATs a week, which is whole numbers of dollars which is nice, but, obviously it's very early days and yes, 22,491 payments. There's a lot of payments, but it's still very early days in terms of the amount of people using this. what I'm excited about is Podcast apps like pod friend, which is making it much easier to understand how this whole thing works. It really handholds you through the process of opening a wallet and transferring some money and transferring some crypto I should say, So I think, once it's easier, once it's simpler and more straightforward, I think it's going to be very interesting seeing how quickly it takes off and whether or not this is the. Primary way, maybe in the future for many independent Podcast is to earn money for their creations and, there's very good reasons. I think why all creativity should be self sustaining in that way.

Sam:

let's see what happens with this going forward now. one story that grabbed me that I didn't understand, but I really wanted to ask you about, was it a service? You talked about another one, another one you've been, you've been grabbing me or in all sorts of places this week, James, it's been awful. Now. Productivity is a privacy friendly method of offering interaction and engagements for podcasts. It's an early alpha with the Jerry Anderson Podcast. I thought this was Thunderbirds first. That's why I got excited, but it's not what is productivity?

James:

Well, it is the same Jerry Anderson as Thunderbirds. It is. yes. So you're absolutely right. I had great fun in pod news this week of putting this story next to a story about the Canadian broadcaster stingray, which I thought was. Uh, vaguely amusing. nobody else noticed anyway. Yes. So productivity something I can't talk too much about, I'm an advisor to the company. First of all, it's from rebel based media, the company that's brought you captivate the podcast host, who I'm also an advisor for we're sponsored by Buzzsprout and but one of the things that productivity is looking at doing is an open. Privacy first way of interacting with podcasts. And particularly with this show, which is the Jerry Anderson podcast. If you go to it on the web, then you can do things like take part in polls. You can see more information, there's a bunch of interactive elements as you listen to it. and that's very much part of where productivity is going, but it's a great company. Mark has been working Mark Asquith. Who's the CEO of rebel based media has been working on this for many years now. and it's really good to see that being a very early test of the Technology, actually out there for people to go along and play. Can you

Sam:

give me an example of where this interactivity might work, how it might

James:

work? So on a very basic level two bits of interactivity might be one bit might be, you go and you are asked should we wear a blue hat or a green hat next week? And you can vote in the player that you're listening to blue or green, or perhaps you hear an ad for Colgate toothpaste and something appears on the screen of your podcast app, which says would you like a free sample? And you press. Yes. And and maybe it takes you somewhere where you can actually get hold of a free sample. So, you know, all that sort of interactivity, it obviously means that there's some information there in terms of understanding how many people are engaging with your podcast as well. But all of that sort of thing is being planned in a very open way, but you know, very, very early days in terms of how this technology works. Okay.

Sam:

Now back to my numbers and our favorite platform 1.3 million scraped user records were leaked this week from clubhouse and in a statement from clubhouse, they simply said, Oh well, it's all public information anyway, which doesn't matter then does it how's clubhouse with you, James, are you still playing with it?

James:

clubhouse is still only on toy phones and because I use an Android phone or proper phone, it's difficult for me to play with it too much. but I occasionally have a look in the amount of buzz from clubhouses significantly down, I noticed there are far fewer people talking about it and 1.3 million scrapes user records. all that really is it's a saying that my name is James Cridland. My clubhouse handle is at James Cridland or whatever the clubhouse handle works like I'm based in this country. it's all of the information that you can both see in the app. And also the information that you can apparently get from an API except they don't actually have an API. So I'm not quite sure why they've said that you can get it from the API because they haven't published the API. But anyway it is public information. There's no usernames, There's no passwords in there. There's no credit card information or any of that stuff. But it's another problem with the security of this app. already we've heard that it's been recording all kinds of things. It's been sending those recordings to China. it's been doing all kinds of weird and wonderful things. so I think it's just another example of weird things that have been going on with this clubhouse app. And probably why, as I keep on saying, I don't think it'll be around in six months time, clearly

Sam:

Mark Zuckerberg, wasn't able to buy Twitter, sniffed around it for a bit, trying to buy it for 4 billion. Cause Mark's motto, I guess is if you can't buy them, beat them. Cause Facebook is testing hotline. Woohoo. A clubhouse like service. Now I can't see that taking off either. but you're already on Twitter spaces. and how's that going?

James:

I'm on Twitter space is not enough. People are using it yet, but the good news is that, you are opening that Twitter app anyway, to take part in Twitter. So you do see when people are running Twitter spaces you do see when people are actually running those. and that's, to be honest is probably enough, I think one of the difficulties with clubhouse is that you have to open the app. You have to play around with it. Yes. You can turn on notifications, but yes, and many people block those thankfully, but whereas Twitter, you've got other reasons to go in and possibly Facebook as well. You've got other reasons to go in and use the app anyway. and of course, all of your friends are on. Twitter. Anyway, if you're on Twitter, you're being followed by people, there's the verified names and all that kind of stuff. and interestingly as a verified name, you get to the top of the list. if you're in a spaces room then the verified people get listed. Before the rest of the hyper lie. I am a verified person. I can't think why, so it's, it's interesting. I'm not too worried about these great user records. It's just, it's not good optics for clump house, given the other privacy issues that they've been having recently. I guess it's just one other, one other issue. not unless they're subsumed by something else, that's much larger. I'm not entirely convinced that it's going to, stay around and it is full of the most dreadful people. So there you go.

Sam:

are we going to start a Twitter spaces?

James:

we can, if you want. it might be fun to play around with that. the issue of course is going to be the time zone issue because you are on a very different backward time zone to what we are here in Australia. to find that bit works, but it might be worth having a play around with that. And if you're following me on Twitter, I'm James Cridland then maybe that will be a plan. I don't know.

Sam:

let's see how it evolves. Now, going back to my numbers for this week, a hundred thousand is my next number. And that is congratulations to our sponsors. Buzzsprout who now have a hundred thousand active podcasts

James:

well done. Yes. which is great. And puts them comfortably in front of Libsyn, which has a variety of different numbers on its website. they don't reply to my press messages. So it's quite difficult to understand how many that they've actually got. But nevertheless, Buzzsprout does have rather a lot more. It has to be said that some of those are free because they offer a free month. If you want to go and have a play with with the, your platform, but even so a hundred thousand active podcasts is a pretty good, is a pretty good place to be. So congratulations to them. And in

Sam:

this week's podcast from them, they did try and address your issue around whether Spotify had more podcasts than

James:

others they did in their buzz cast Podcast. and yes, and they've gone into a little bit more information there. I have since got a ton of really interesting data, both out of Buzzsprout, but also out of a bunch of other data sources and. I think that there's a really interesting story here around the future of the industry, whether Apple really is as large as many people say it is. I've got some questions into the folks at Libsyn, because I want to make sure that I'm saying the right things about their platform and I'm looking forward to them coming back with some comments on that

Sam:

Now. last week we talked about road Casto wonderful company over there in Australia who brought out their new beater firmware. I've been using it and it's very good. also thank you to Rhode for changing all the audio levels. So I had to reconfigure the whole desk to run, but other than that, it is very good. Thank you very much. I would use the new bleep feature to not swear. but the brought out, which I think is more interesting this week, a product called road connect, which allows you to connect up to four NT, USB mini microphones at the same computer. So if you don't have a road podcaster pro desk, but you still want to run four mikes of a USB setup, this is a software only solution. I've used it this week. Any thoughts? Have you seen it yet,

James:

James? I've seen the press coverage of it. I haven't seen it in person because I don't own the NT USB mini microphones, which is the only microphones it works with. That said one of the things that it has uncovered is that there's a bunch of additional software in those NT, USB mini microphones that have, things like, additional compression, something that they call the big bottom. Oh yes. Yes. always good to be able to talk about the big bottom and then they've put in brackets after its trademark. they clearly want the big bottom as a trademark and why not? so it turns out that, as with all of these things, they've actually got a bunch of additional software in there. NT USB mini microphones, which will enable those microphones to do a few additional things that they haven't actually enabled yet. So that's pretty cool. I guess from my point of view, I would like to have seen road connect work with all of roads, USB mics, or indeed, any USB mic out there, because I think that will be helpful. And maybe not all of us have four road microphones, but we might have one road microphone and one shore microphone or whatever it is. And it would be quite nice to be able to use this software for that. But they haven't done that yet, but who knows what they might do in the future.

Sam:

with my radio station luckily we chose the NTSB mini mikes for all of our presenters for home use, because it was slightly cheaper than the road Podcast or pro mic, which you and I use. I've now started to test the road connect for actually remote recording with those mikes into the studio. So we'll see. Oh,

James:

very good. that sounds good.

Sam:

A bit of luck there. That was well, that's it for this week in Podland James. So what have you been up to what's been happening and what you're going to be doing in Podland next week? so

James:

next week, it's the Apple announcement on the 20th. So that'll be fun. I'm also beginning to work on Podcast day 24. If you've not heard of Podcast day 24, yet it is a. 24 hour Podcast conference, which is what we all need. Isn't it. but one of the nice things, it's a bit like live aid. If you're of the same age as I am, where it starts in the morning in Australia then moves to London and it then moves to the to North America. So it's going to be a really nice day full of some really interesting content around podcasting. And I am helping the folks with the Australian side of that. So Podcast day 24 is very nice. You'll find a discount code in the pod news newsletter.

Sam:

And quick question. This is our friend, Matt Deegan doing this.

James:

It is it's. Matt Deegan who looks after the British Podcast awards and the Australian Podcast awards. but it's also the folks at radio days, Europe. Who have looked after Podcast day for many years and radio days, Europe and indeed radio days, Asia for many more years. it's basically a ton of people that know what they're doing. and then me, which is nice. so that should be good. But the Podcast day I spoke at it a couple of years ago. It's a really good, very focused on content conference about podcasting. So you won't necessarily get people standing up and. Teaching you all about your Rolodex and all about, maintaining the maintaining of life relationships. it's much more around producing great audio, how to tell great stories with audio. all of that stuff, lots of radio broadcasters there, but lots of independent Podcast is there as well. So it should be really good obviously. there's a ton of virtual stuff for you to take part in. So you'll be taking part online from the comfort of your own home. but it should be a really interesting 24 hours and one would assume that it's all going to be available on demand once it finishes as well.

Sam:

What was the day again? I didn't

James:

catch that and it is on fi. 7th of June. Okay.

Sam:

Now I've caught it.

James:

You've gone very quiet there.

Sam:

I'm waiting for you to say that they explained what's happening with you, Sam.

James:

Oh, yes. So what's happening in Podland this week for you, Sam.

Sam:

Thank you for asking James. I've been playing with brilliant broadcast to Podcast service. So it takes a live radio feed and it could take any other feed, actually ice cast or shoutcast, and it brilliantly converts that into a listen again and I Podcast and you could even drop out the music automatically or magically as I call it. no, it's great. Thank you, Rob, from from a whisker and strangely a couple of weeks back we got talking about NFTs, non fungible tokens and community tokens. I was listening to another podcast. I know I do listen to other podcasts, and there was. Guy there called Ralph Paul talking about how you can use NFTs in community. And it piqued my interest so much that I decided with another friend of mine to start a secondary Podcast when it's going to happen and how I have no idea yet what hours I'm going to free up. But my old boss is Michael Saylor. He's the CEO of microstructure. I used to be the worldwide marketing director for them. And Michael is the world's biggest owner now of Bitcoin, I think. so Michael seller announced earlier this week that his firm micro stress, she had purchased approximately 328 more Bitcoins for $15 million each in cash, bringing the total to 4.4, $5 billion that the company micro stress, she owned liters per half

James:

billion dollars of imaginary money. Yeah.

Sam:

Well, listen to Michael. It's not because his view is that fear currency is being devalued by central banks because of printing funny monies. And actually, What he can do with a Bitcoin is because it is secure and it's limited. And you can guarantee won't be devalued other than obviously if it's price goes up or down. So the average price of per Bitcoin at the time of his purchase was $45,710. And as we know, it's now gone up to 66,000. So I knew that he's even richer if he needs to be even richer on the back of that, I decided that we would start a podcast and Michael's going to be one of my first guests. Then you go.

James:

Thanks. Excellent. And what's the name of this Podcast on NFT community tokens?

Sam:

We haven't come up with a name it's that new yet, but

James:

invite you it'll involve the words and the community community. we'd have thoughts, but anyway, for those of us who don't know, because I'm sure that there are some people out there, obviously I do know. but I'm sure that there are some people out there who don't know who is micro strategy and what do they do other than buy Bitcoin? Okay.

Sam:

So micro structure, one of the first companies to do data warehousing in the old day, it was called online analytical processing, and now we call it the cloud and now we call it big data, but they were one of the first companies around they're based out of Washington Tyson's corner. And Michael is a genius and a madman wrapped in one the youngest billionaire under 40. he, when I joined the company, decided to hire a whole cruise liner and take us all the whole company around the Caribbean for a trip. And my first team meeting was with six of my team in a hot tub. Um, Michael sailor would fly all of the parents from anyone who worked for him twice a year. To Washington for a barbecue at free. And, but he would then proceed to give a three hour lecture on what or who was micro strategy to our parents blazed over the heads of all of them, but he loved doing it. So genius and madman in the same breath.

James:

Wow. no, we are. And that's it for this week. If you've enjoyed your trips of hotlines, come back again. Next time you can follow this podcast on all the major Podcast players or visit the website at Podland dot news. It's

Sam:

really listening and thank you for sticking around for this part. We know you've over 2 million podcasts out there that you have the chance to listen to. So we're really grateful for your time. If you have any comments about anything on the show today, send us a voice comment to questions at Podland dot news or tweet us at Podland

James:

news. And if you want daily news, you should get the daily pod news newsletter. It's free@podnews.net. Ask me what I know about email delivery. My goodness. I have been boning up on that this week. Anyway, that's where you'll find the links for all the stories we've mentioned this week. The music spike night jingles were recorded with Riverside and with zoom this week, we edited with Hindenburg pro and we are hosted. And sponsored by Buzzsprout.

Sam:

We'll see you in Podland next week. Please tell your friends about us and please keep following