Podland News

What happens to podcast downloads if IP addresses go away? Interview: Bryan Barletta, plus automating YouTube for podcasting.

August 19, 2021 James Cridland, Sam Sethi Season 1 Episode 38
Podland News
What happens to podcast downloads if IP addresses go away? Interview: Bryan Barletta, plus automating YouTube for podcasting.
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James:

Welcome to Portland. Portland is sponsored by Buzzsprout used by over a hundred thousand podcasters like us to host, promote and track your podcast. And by riverside.fm, 2.0 recording podcasts and video interviews in studio quality from anywhere. Just got an upgrade and an iOS app we're using it now. The upgrade, not the iOS app. It's the 19th of August, 2021. I'm James credit and the editor of hot news.net in Australia.

Bryan:

I think here in the UK and I'm Brian Barletta from sounds profitable. And later I'll talk about who wins when IP address is disappeared.

James:

Portland's a weekly podcast where Sam and I delve deeper into the week's podcasting news.

Sam:

So let's get going with the big stories from pod news this week. Now. Your listing tasted music. Let's have a little chat about that for a second. Oh yeah. Amazon apple or Spotify. You use something else,

James:

don't you? I do. I use YouTube music. Yes.

Sam:

What, why

James:

it's possibly going to be the next question? so I've got a Spotify account, which has a couple accounts. So my other half uses that a fair amount, but mainly I use YouTube music because the algorithms are better for. Hey, just play me some music. So it's got a bunch of different automated algorithms that just seem to do quite a good job. So I keep on coming back to YouTube music and keep on using it. And it's, it's a pretty good service. Do you use it

Sam:

for podcasting as well? Listen to your podcasts. I

James:

don't use it for listening to podcasts, so it doesn't have a podcast app in the same way that Spotify does all the Deezer does. For example. Quite a lot of people use YouTube for listening to podcasts, because there are quite a few podcasts which are uploaded there. I don't use it for that. I just use it for music.

Sam:

Yeah. So Tom Webster says that nearly one in five weekly listeners say that YouTube is their primary service for podcasts. That's a lot more than I thought. Cause I have never listened to her or even seen, a podcast. unless you call it a video cast, is it a case of. They're recording the podcast as a video and putting it out onto apple as a podcast now onto

James:

YouTube as video, it was pretty well what's going on. So I read Tom's newsletter, which basically says you should be in YouTube. You should make your podcast available in YouTube. It's really important because people will find it there. And I looked at that and I thought, oh, maybe I should put the pod news pod. Into YouTube. So worked out a way of automating that. And so that's now automatically getting uploaded into YouTube. Thank you, Zapier, for having a clever trick in order to get there. So that was pretty cool. So there are some podcasts which are available in that way. Joe Rogan, for example, obviously used to put his entire podcast in inverted commas onto YouTube. I know that some people will claim it's not a podcast, at the end of the day, that conversation is a boring one. I don't particularly wish to start entertaining that one, but yeah, there are a bunch of things that people call podcasts available on YouTube. And it's probably important if you are a podcaster to be there anyway, so that people actually find you on that platform too, I think.

Sam:

Okay. Can you talk us through a little bit? You said you use Zapier, which is basically a way of automating the process, but what did you actually

James:

do? I've pronounced to wrongly. Have I, is it is up here. Zapier is French. Is it zip PA? it's so tomato. So yes. So what I do bear in mind that I self host. So that's a first step, but I self host my entire podcast. So therefore, one of the things that I started doing about three, four months ago is I have a hugely complicated bit of apple scripts and command line code, which basically takes the audio that I. Produce and add the images to it and produces different versions of it and does all of that stuff. And then uploads it to Amazon S3 where I serve it from. So I figured that there was a way using FFM peg of producing a video version, which is essentially the audio with a graph. So you can do that relatively easily and relatively simply, and then using a bit of a Zapiar magic that is then automatically uploaded to YouTube, directly from that. So I'm not probably, the typical. Podcaster in terms of the way that I host my show, but that's certainly been quite useful in terms of being able to completely automate it. I, my thought was if I get another 10 plays, then great. As long as I spent no additional time whatsoever. In getting my show onto YouTube if I get any additional plays and it just so happens. I think that the first show that I threw up there has got 17 plays so far. that's 17 plays that it might not have done otherwise. So that's probably not too bad. So I'll carry on doing that, particularly if it's completely automated. But if I was uploaded. Manually every single time then? no, it's suddenly not worth my time in terms of doing that. It's interesting

Sam:

because, I do a football podcast and we're going to live stream that to YouTube and Facebook today. And so once it's live streamed, actually it's stored and saved. The process of uploading doesn't become a process, but then it's not edited either. So they were going to see whether we can do an unedited version of the YouTube channel. And then we're going to edit the podcast for apple and Spotify, et cetera, et cetera, because we think that's where we want to do the editing time. So it would be interesting. What the take-up is. Yeah, probably nothing, but yeah, no,

James:

I think it's relatively low. Yeah. Although it was interesting to see. Cause I use YouTube to watch the occasional random bit of video as well, too. Like Tom Scott stuff. And there the bloke on the isle of man, I can't remember his name at the moment, the bloke on the Clive, on the isle of man who. Takes electronics to bits of an

Sam:

exciting life.

James:

You laugh Sethi. so I use a YouTube, a fair amount. And what was interesting is that it came up to me, with a recommendation to go and listen to pod news, which I thought was quite fascinating. So clearly it spotted that I like the occasional thing about podcasting. So if it's done that to other people, then that. Really interesting. There is a old wives tale, and I'm still relatively convinced. It is no wives tale saying that if you just upload a static image with some audio, then Google's algorithms or you choose algorithms. Don't like it very much. And it never appears on recommendations. I would like to see some data behind that because the only people I've heard saying that have been saying that based on hunches, one

Sam:

of the things we do with this podcast is. Add chapters and we add chapter imagery. Could you automate it so that those chapters and chapter imagery appeared in the YouTube video in effect so that the actual static image wasn't static, but it was actually changing with the

James:

chapters. That is what some people have suggested. I am aware that there are a few tools. I think PRX made one of them, which does a sort of headliner type, bouncing graphic of the audio as well. And it occurs to me that, that's probably something which is sitting there waiting for an enterprising coder to end up doing. If it doesn't exist already, of course, to pull the chapter information out of the. Audio file and to, add the bouncing imagery and all that kind of stuff. If there's a command line tool that you can use for that, then, yeah, I'm certainly all, all up for that. That will be fantastic. Hey,

Sam:

maybe somebody will tell us now moving on. last week we had a little chat about podcast movement, and we talked about. Mark Cuban, being less great teeth. Great. Great. Yeah, basically he was not very complimentary about the podcasting industry, but one of the things you did last week was you pointed out the terms of service, which were a little bit erroneous. What's happened since.

James:

Yes. So they've ended up changing their terms of service, which is nice. I got a tip off from the fire side PR team, which is nice and they have removed a thing. They've taken one thing out of the terms of service, which basically said. We can basically take your idea and produce something which is competitive to it. which was nice. And they've actually taken that clause completely out of the terms and conditions, which is really good and exactly what they should be doing, what they have. Kept in the terms of conditions, sadly is the clause that says that Pharcyde owns everything that you make on the platform and can use it and can even sell it without paying you a penny. And that information is still there, which is in complete contradiction to what a fan on for termites. On stage, whereas she was apparently saying your ideas are your IP. yes, they might be my IP, but I've also given them to fantasize to go out and sell by signing the terms and conditions. So it is interesting. And I thought it was interesting that the PR company didn't come back to me after I re read their terms and conditions and pointed this out again. Yeah. So I wonder quite what's going on there, except I don't really wonder what's going on there because I tried logging into fire site this afternoon and I got a beautiful sign. As I logged into fireside, it says account access locked, please contact support@firesidechat.com. There is an issue with your account is the issue that I've mentioned, what your terms and conditions are. So maybe I'm the first person to get banned from Pharcyde, but that's not a particularly good look.

Sam:

that was pretty cool, actually that I put that down as a little memento, clip it and put it on your wall. Now, moving on, you were talking about IP. Let's talk about something else. IP addresses. Now Brian Barletta, friend of the show has been talking about. IP addresses. What's he been going on about I'm so

James:

pleased that you've started doing this friend of the show thing. It's a wonderful thing. yes. Brian has been talking about, so apple is doing a thing called private relay, which is there to hide your IP addresses from other people they're using it for safari at the moment, or for, they will be using it for safari. There'll be using it for, apple mail and stuff like that. Of course, VPNs do the same sort of job as well. P address and they give your IP address, to people that you connect to. they give an IP address, which is shared with many other people. And that sounds like a great idea for privacy, because it is however, is that a great idea for. Podcasting, because it turns out that IP addresses are the way that we count the amount of downloads that we get. And it really gave me pause for thought. When I read what Brian had written about in sounds profitable. So to find out more, I caught up with Brian Butler. From sounds profitable and asked him a little more.

Bryan:

So it sounds portable is a, newsletter first and now a podcast going on six months for the podcasts a year for the newsletter, all about podcast advertising and advertising technology. And it's part of the pod news network. Okay.

James:

I've heard of that. Tell us we are losing IP addresses in the future. How does that work?

Bryan:

I think the writing's on the wall. I think privacy is the new cool. And as a consumer, I'm all about it. I think. We're in a situation where privacy is being used to mask the advantages that these major silos are benefiting from, because they benefit the individuals. So massively at the slight advantage, have these individual silos that we can ignore because it's way less invasive than everything else they've done. So apple and plenty of other providers out there started. Cookie started to remove mobile device ID. we see these statistics about Facebook dropping to 4% of mobile device ID shared with it. And now IP address is the next on the chopping block because IP address can still tie to so many things. It can still tie to your household. It can still tie to public record information. there's a lot there. And first party data ties to IP address, right? So if you log into New York times or something else, it attaches there. Apple is making a play with their new, private relay, their new product. That's part of iCloud, which iCloud plus actually, which is just an upgrade for everybody who is already having iCloud, which I think most people on an iPhone or iOS device have that it's going to start masking that IP address. And so it starts as only being something in safari, but I cloud is a central part of the entire operating system. And safari is a baked in yeah. And so it's a no brainer that this is just them testing the waters to move completely away from sharing IP address, which unfortunately for podcasting is the only actual listener metric.

James:

Because I was going to ask the IP address. So you've got. Private relay, which is masking IP addresses, but actually Google has something similar. They're giving a free VPN away to anybody with a Google one account. And they've been doing that for the last six months or so. And of course, loads of people use VPNs as well. When you don't have IP addresses, what does that mean for a typical podcast? Host a typical a company that wants to just analyze how many people they have getting their podcast. Yeah.

Bryan:

So the IP address right now will help you get down to relatively the individual. if it, a bunch of people from a college are all downloading a podcast, they're going to look similar, unfortunately. but what we're talking about is that on a bigger scale, Is going to look like they're from colleges, right? Everybody is going to look like they're bound together. So while my household and the household of everybody on my street right now looks different with IP address while cellular connections look different per device, what we're going to see is geo-based groupings right down to maybe a city level, as high as a country level. But those groupings are going to mean that everybody in San Antonio, Texas is going to look exactly the same. So how does a podcast host differential. Which one is an individual for every unique download of what a pod news. So if you have a hundred people listening in San Antonio in the future where these IP addresses are all aggregated together, and it just shows up as one, you don't know if that's one person downloading it a hundred times or a hundred individuals.

James:

we might not know in the future how many people are downloading our podcasts at all. So it's a privacy thing and privacy is good, but also we're actually losing any numbers at all in terms of podcast downloads, which is possibly not quite so good.

Bryan:

Yeah. And that's the big thing here is that. the value to the consumer is fantastic. But podcasting is built on this chicken and egg scenario of whose audiences at actually, You ask NPR whose audience it is. And they'll say, it's theirs. You ask apple, let's say it's theirs. So we have the app and we have the content. Now the app wins, apple doesn't need IP address. They have the listener being unique because if not, then my playlist and your playlist would look exactly the same if they couldn't differentiate between the two of us. And then from there they're sending that request for the episode. Apple doesn't care, how little data they said neither to Spotify, Google, Amazon, any of these players, they capture all of it. But that hosting platform does need to know that for things such as content restrictions in geolocation, or, so many different things, but the core getting to the absolute core is that we. All the podcasts reporting on IP address because I don't think 20 years ago, anybody really thought, or even four years ago, anybody really thought that IP address was going to go away. Privacy was a pipe dream to the level it is right now. But what this means is that those podcast players either they're going to continue this silo game they're playing and just completely split up. And we're going to have no say in it or the hosting platforms and the publishers are going to have to get together and say, I'm just not comfortable with my content being anywhere that I can't get that information, whether it's continued IP, probably not. Or it's a different identifier that still gives the same semblance and value, and probably even provides more value by saying the app said the listener actually listened to this much of the episode.

James:

So whether it's Apple's private relay or. VPNs or anything else we're going to a world of people like buzz sprouts, our sponsor people like Libsyn, people like captivate, simply not having the numbers, but apple and Spotify and other podcast apps. We'll still have the numbers, but they'll be obviously within apple and Spotify ecosystem, which essentially means they win. And it means that a independent podcast has podcasters who are, even if you're self hosting, as I do for the pod news podcast or hosting here on Buzzsprout for Podland means that essentially we get no numbers anymore. Only way that we can get those numbers is to log into apple podcasts, connect and into Spotify for podcasters and into presumably pocket cost system and player FM system and so on and so forth. that's a concern, isn't it? Yeah.

Bryan:

it's definitely a concern. And I think that this is something that I've been trying to fight since I started a year ago, is that we have such a game of misdirection by these privacy focused podcast. People. Podcasting at its core is the most privacy focused format in all of media with advertising, right? maybe out of home, I think maybe billboards I'll give you that one. but at this point, I mean your hosting provider doesn't get that much data. The publishers get even less, the tracking services and attribution partners get even less than that. The apps have everything. They are not in any way, passing over listener consent, opt in, or opt out, whatever it may be. They're just making this request. They're not telling us anything. And they. All of it. Spotify, for example, as an app can tell, if your phone's up or in your pocket, right? Like it can tell if you're using headphones, it can tell you if you're playing it on a speaker, all these different actions, these apps know so much more than anyone in podcasting does and they're keeping it to themselves. And this will just be one more thing. Just pushes us towards the silo lifestyle. And I really hope we push back because I think that bigger companies will be able to weather it. NPR just hired two people to manage their subscription services through apple luxury. I don't think many people can really afford. but imagine if you were a mid tier publisher doing pretty well and now you have to log into every portal or even worse sounds profitable. Does this downwardly well on overcast? It, there's no reason for Marco to ever build out that portal. Yeah. So if 40% of my total listens are on a podcast player that just happens to resonate with my listeners that doesn't want to participate in this. And actually doesn't capture that data. I'm dead in the water.

James:

what are we going to do about it? Brown Barletta, what are you going to do about it? Oh God.

Bryan:

I think, I grew up a little bit in this year. I think that it was very fun to, to yell about all these things and to tell people about all these things and try and idealistically. I have not been the biggest fan of the IAB, but the truth is that they're the only one organizing everyone in this room. So I have joined the tech lab and I have joined the audio committee and I'm going to talk to every single person I can. I'm going to reach out and continue to talk with apple, Google, Spotify, Amazon. And I'm going to advocate for all of them to just come to the table and build a framework. We're past the point of rad the, the listening spec that MTR created. I think that we need to. Core functionality. I think we need to safeguard the base analytics of podcasting. We need to acknowledge that as an industry, we do still revolve around RSS. We find such value in the open nature of it. If IP address wants to go away, I think every single person in podcasting would raise their hand in support of that. If we do not lose the metrics on the hosting and publisher side. So this is my invitation. I will gladly play shepherd. I will gladly play matchmaker and do whatever I have to do to get everyone at the table. To just figure out how we do this and maybe how we're the first industry in advertising to abandon IP address ahead of the curve to show people how it's done once again.

James:

Wow. That'll be fascinating. Where can we read more of this? If we want to find it? Yeah,

Bryan:

sounds profitable.com. and you can find, the newsletter. You can find the podcast. You can find the product deep dives, where I go over, how all these different, amazing ad tech products work. And at the end of the day, I just want to say that ad tech and podcasting is the entire technology stack. Every aspect of it can help people advertise. So this is really important. Advertising will survive. These core metrics are critical to everybody who does baked in ads to not even doing ads, to doing patriarchy and self-funded or to just do it for fun. So this is critical to everybody and I hope everybody gets involved. Brian, thanks for that. Thanks for having me, Brian Barletta

Sam:

from sounds profitable. Are we any wise then? What's the solution, James, if we aren't going to be able to count downloads.

James:

I think hopefully the IAB will come up with some plans. Dave Jones has come up with a plan as well. The U L ID, which measures downloads something. Personally would like something that measures listens because I think a listen or a play is rather more helpful than a download because automatic downloads are relatively useless, but I think, quite a lot of it is just we need to work together because otherwise we give all of the control in the podcasting space to the apples and Spotify is of this world and indeed to overcast and those sorts of, of, services. And really it should be up to the creator at least should know how many plays their podcast is getting. So working together as an industry as I think the only way forward. So it's great to hear that Brian has joined the IAB and will be helping them with that.

Sam:

Downloads the right metric though. a couple of weeks ago we had the apple bug where downloads weren't happening and the numbers dropped. And I said, maybe it's a feature, because maybe it's the better metric is the number of times your podcast is played. And then you said, no, and you've spoken to apple. It's not a feature. It is a bug. But actually if apple and in their privacy jihad are going to remain. the IP address along with other things have been doing that. Oh, is it just a better metric to say that's the number of plays? Cause it was an advertiser. That's all I care about. If I don't care about how many times my podcast advert was downloaded, if it wasn't heard, it

James:

makes no difference. I would probably go further. I think that automatic downloads, aren't actually very helpful. They use a lot, an awful lot of completely pointless bandwidth. They muddy the waters in terms of, in terms of stats. And, I think that. In 2005, they made an awful lot of sense to slowly trickle down media and data through your tiny little internet connection overnight so that you had some more media to consume. But we don't need any of that now because our internet pipes are large enough. I think from my point of view, I would be very comfortable if auto downloads were not a thing anymore. And it did make me think. I wonder when the last time that I turned on auto downloads on my podcast app was, and I think I haven't turned auto downloads on for the last five years. so occasionally I will download shows when I'm getting on an airplane. I remember them so I can have a listen to them there. I don't live in London anymore. And so obviously I'm not using the tube and using the underground means that, of course you have no, data connections. And so you can't do any of that, but it is coming slowly, but surely, that's one place where Russia gets it right in Moscow. The wifi is on the trains, not in the station, which makes an awful lot more sense. But anyway, I just don't see how auto downloads helps anyone with the tiny exception of people who commute on the tube and people who use airplanes a lot. But, I work personally get rid of it, but. That's just me. And it's very easy for me to say that because I have a very large mobile data tariff and I can download as much as I like for people who maybe don't have that large mobile data tariff, things are different. Or if you live in Canada where mobile data costs so much anyway, there may be, things are a different thing, but, yeah.

Sam:

Now, James, did you get invited to be on the podcast academy board or did you get an award or did you actually go to the website? Anytime

James:

last year I gave it to talk about, a month or so ago for the podcast academy and loads of people saw it and loads of people contacted me afterwards saying what a great talk it was and how can we book you for your oh no, they didn't quite do that. But. It was, it was really good. So yeah, there is a bunch of information on the podcast Academy's website in terms of membership. I would probably have got better value from it if I lived in a better time zone, but, yeah, it's a good thing for me to be in. I think. So you are going

Sam:

to renew your academy. Membership. Yeah,

James:

I think, for many of us, it is almost time to renew our membership. Some of us already have what the organization has said is they've changed their plan. Their plan was that you had to go back to the website and renew and fill out the forms all over again. But now they are renewing automatically. You'll just get an email to. Beforehand, which kind of makes sense. I think everybody's had little bits of criticism about what the podcast academy has or hasn't done, but the Ambius were a very good first award ceremony this year. I'm sure that's going to get bigger and better as we move back into in-person events for next year. And I know that they were quite active. Podcast movement. Although of course not many of us could have been there either. yeah, so I think it's a good thing and I think, people should give it its support and should renew when the time comes.

Sam:

Okay. So what is the goal for the podcast

James:

academy? Partially the goal is to raise the standing of the industry and to ensure that great creative work is recognized. I. Have always been jumping up and down saying that the girl should also be best practice. The goals should be a lobbying group of podcasters to folks like apple and to Spotify and everything else. They are very clear that they have no interest in that whatsoever. and that's probably fine, if a bit sad. but I think, As an organization, very similar to the radio academy in the UK of a set of people who are there to, move the industry forward to recognize great creative work, where it happens, to run awards, ceremonies and that sort of thing. I think that's a good thing to aim at. And it's very similar of course, to the film and movie academy or whatever the thing's called that runs the Oscars as well.

Sam:

Okay.

James:

What do you think of the academy? Cause I sense a different view.

Sam:

I dunno. It's amazing how you've got mystic Meg capabilities there. Now I have to say I won't be renewing and, I haven't had anything that's given me any value out of it that I thought, I must put another $50 yeah. To the pole. And that'll be

James:

a hundred dollars by the way, because you've got a special deal last time.

Sam:

So I, I don't, and I think if they did take it. Bigger stronger role in the podcast industry. we just talked about, the IAB, we talked about downloads, we talked about standards, we've talked about so many other things. The people are doing more for this industry and I would happily give them a hundred dollars. Is Adam Curry and Dave. They've moved the industry forward a whole load more, even if not everything they're doing is actually, everything that's going to happen, but they at least knocking the door, asking the questions and making the changes. And that's what I hope that podcasts academy was going to do. But it didn't.

James:

Yeah, I would agree with that. I would temper that by saying that I think these are very different ends of the industry. And I think what Adam Curry and Dave Jones and the podcast index and the new namespace has done is very much grassroots. It's very much coming back to the foundation of podcasting. Whereas I think the podcast academy is the glamour and the glitz and the Hollywood and the, the wonder is of this world. And I think they are a very different. Constituency, but yes, if you're looking at moving the industry forward, in terms of technology, in terms of new ideas, then there is no better place right now than the podcast index and the podcast namespace. And I think that they're doing a fantastic job in there. I don't always agree with everything they do. But I think one of the things that they are being very good at doing now is listening to everybody that's involved on the podcast index.social site, and, making sure that, everybody gets a say and everybody is listened to. And I think that's a great move. If there's an award for the people that have moved the podcast industry on more than anyone else over the last 12 months. Definitely go to abdomen today. I think they've done a fantastic job

Sam:

moving swiftly on now. Voss sprung, Springwood door technique. James, do you speak German?

James:

I speak enough, that I understood a bit of this thing. Yes. Do you want to explain what it is?

Sam:

There's new podcast report that was released in Germany called hitting the right tone. It's a detailed a hundred. Three page report, about podcasting in Germany and it's now available. So when I went and clicked on the link, of course it would stupidly, why would I expect it to be in English? It was in German. but you actually did read through it. and you've got some highlights from it. I did

James:

one highlight was what they called Adam Curry, which I thought was fantastic. Would you like to know what the pod father is in German? Go for it. It's podcast. yes. podcast Granado Varta Adam Curry. no, it was a really interesting report. It's massive as well. 33 pages long. It's got more data about podcasting in Germany than you ever thought that you wanted to end up seeing. what it is it's a bunch of data which is available in other places, but it's great to see it all pulls together and it's all German data. So there's no Edison research stuff in here. There's no dial tedious pod track, information. It's all German stuff. For example, Spotify. Is the most used podcast platform in Germany, 38% of German podcast listeners use it. 38% apple podcast is at number three, we're just 9.8%. And YouTube is the one in the middle 12%. Going back to what we said earlier, which is fascinating. There's also some really interesting data around age ranges in there. Particularly you can see that. Old people, 55 plus 65. Plus, those sorts of people, very rarely used things like Spotify. And I'm much more likely to use both things like apple podcasts, but also the ARDSM podcast app, which is. Big German, public service broadcaster. some really interesting information in there, even if you just flip through and have a look for the graphs it's well worthwhile. The other thing that I thought was really cool is it talks about a lot of different podcasts in there. And in the side notes, it's got QR codes, which help you. If you want to go and have a listen to one of the podcasts that they mentioned, then you just scan the QR code. Brilliant idea. So it's the first podcast, report that I've ever seen using QR codes and what a great idea. So it's well worth a read, link to it from pod news on Wednesday. And it's a really good, even if you don't speak a word of German, you'll still understand most of the, of the graphs and things. It's well worth having a look while I'll

Sam:

put a link in the show notes. Yeah, indeed. Now I thought we'd have a look at some of the new apps that are floating around this month. We talked at the beginning of a Riverside to the IO, which is what we're recording this show in. What have they added James to Riverside today? Oh, then yeah.

James:

So they announced it. just in the last 24 hours, Riverside 2.0, it looks much the same as Riverside. One point out, I have to be honest, but it's got a load, more stuff in it. So it's got something called AI video, which is very clever, which you will find really helpful for some of the things that you're doing for the YouTube versions of the old spice boys, your, your football podcast. What it does automatically is it switches cameras, but it switches cameras. It works out when that person is going to talk and then switches the camera before that person starts talking. If you see what I mean when it's mixing down the video afterwards, so you end up with this really nicely mixed together. that you can end up using, it's got full transcriptions in there as well, which is very nice. It's also got an iPhone app now, so you can take part in a recording if you only have an iPhone, which is all very smart as well. If you want to have a quick play with that, then there is a code on their website, which I thought I would pass on here, which is live 35. And if you use that code live thirty5@riverside.fm, you'll get 35% off the first month. They've asked us to say none of this. who knows what they're thinking. but, it's a really good rock, solid tool, and it's really nice to see them spending quite a lot of time, adding functions and adding features and making it. Just car seats.

Sam:

Another podcast player has launched an embeddable podcast player itself, which supports chapters from the podcast namespace.

James:

Have you tried? yes, I've tried it. I've tried it on the pod news podcast, which doesn't contain any chapters through the podcast namespace. So that's not very helpful, is it? But it is the first embeddable podcast player I've seen that supports chapters from the podcast namespace, which is very cool and very neat. And what's nice about it is that it's open source. Reacts component, which I'll be honest. I don't understand. But I gather that makes it really easy to add to your website if you use reacts, which I don't, but you can see it on the pod news podcast at the very least. if you search for pod news is embedded podcast players page where we show up. These things, again, really nice to see somebody using some of the new tools that, Adam and Dave have been working on in a production that anybody can use verbal.

Sam:

It's added leaderboards to its app. What explain? I didn't get it. What, why

James:

leaderboard? so it's another way of getting a chart. Isn't it? So verbal, it's an interesting sort of mix of podcast, app and other things. the things which are on their stations. So you can have playlist of various things. You can upload your own audio to it, if you want to, all of that stuff, but they've added leaderboards to the app. So it shows what pieces of audio are most popular. That's both clear. But also in, but also podcast shows as well. the daily news leader board, is a particularly good leader board because when I went to have a look at it, the number one daily news show on verbal was pod news. So I was. That always nice to end up seeing. the company has also updated their iOS app. I don't think they've got an Android app out there, but you can, you can actually use their website and that seems to work quite nicely. yeah, that's a good thing. Cool.

Sam:

Just rapidly running through a few of the other products have updated audio editor, ardor has released 6.9. Again, what is their audio editor,

James:

James? Yeah, it's a very fancy and very complicated looking audio editor, like a Hindenburg except really fancy and complicated looking. yeah. but it is, freely available. It's a free open source, quite complicated audio editor. And so that's there for you. They're busy working on a version seven as we speak solve is a new on demand. Podcasting app, which again is doing well. It's wanting to be another sort of audio. Boo. It's wanting to have very short shows, but this one's a mix of short shows. You can only have up to 15 minutes on there. it's a mix. That with a bit of clubhouse or Pharcyde built in that it's got an automated way to find a panelists and to post shows afterwards. So if you want to, you can go onto the system, go into solve, solve with two V's and you can say, I want to talk about Bitcoin. And it will find you three other panelists to talk about Bitcoin. You talk about Bitcoin for 15 minutes. It automatically stops and makes that show available as long as you're on the app, because it's not available as a podcast and not available via an RSS feed, but interesting to see. More people diving into social podcasting, apps as well. And then there's pod kite as well. Isn't the same thing. It's added a way to

Sam:

embed the reviews for your podcast on your own website, which is cool. I think that's a good feature. Would you, or have you James added podcasts to

James:

your website? So I have a boring rule, which is that I don't embed third party code on my website. Deep and hidden in the embedded podcasts page, for example. so now I haven't done that. They do have an API as well, by the way. So I could dive in and do that. But if you want to embed the reviews, feel podcast on your own site, then podcast is a great way of doing that. It pulls them from both apple podcasts and from pod chaser at the same time. So it's pretty good tool. Yeah, we won't

Sam:

use it on Podland. We don't have neurosurgeons.

James:

Not yet. Yeah, go and reveal us, say something nice.

Sam:

We told them all of about 10 shows ago that it doesn't matter.

James:

Yes, there is also back to, and castomatic customatic is doing something nice too.

Sam:

Aren't they? Cosmetics and iOS app it's working on adding those things. Booster Graham's hooray. It allows listeners to send a message along with a tip from their app as they listened. So who else has been doing some of that

James:

as well? This week? Yeah. And FA fountain has also added boost to grams to it app as well. Fountain is probably the app. If you want to go and play with, sending boosts and boost programs to your favorite podcast is fountain is probably the easiest and most straightforward way of doing that. It's available on both Android. the phones, and you can give that a play and it's wonderful that they have added boost programs into their system as well. So that's really cool. And I've been playing around with that. It's dead easy to get started dead, easy to load it up with a little bit of SATs and away you go and talking about SATs and boost to grams. I'm hoping that Adam might record us say it's booster Graham Cole. but that was me doing an Adam Curry impersonation there. I'm not quite sure how good that was, but anyway, yes. It's time for booster ground corner every week. We hope to read some of these messages out. And you might remember from last week, Kyron or Kirin still, haven't quite worked it out from the mere mortals podcast, said hi to James and Sethi, which I thought was hilarious. And Send something saying, Hey, Sam stroke, Cridland. ha. apologies. I obviously did that last Boostgram in a rush to make up for it. These stats are just for you and he is sent, it says here 1,101 SATs and that sent through Curio caster. Thank you, Karen. For that's very kind. Yeah. Thank you very

Sam:

much. I was worried last week that it was, might have been an old school teacher at my public school. Cause that's the only time anyone calls me Sethi, but they go, funnily enough. Yeah. It's from our good friend, Dave Jones, who says really great SETI interview with Michael Martin. Mauritson last week. here's enough SATs for a beer of Sam's choosing I'm thinking Sam's in. Oatmeal stout or maybe a port, Porter he's booked. I'm not sure what that means, but, I think he's suggesting that we Brits just drink dark beer, but, and that was probably true in many ways, because we don't have any nice warm, but thank you, Dave,

James:

for sending it through us. Do you not know what a Porter is? Sethi explain a Porter porters. Oh my goodness. So a Porter is a bit like a stout, but less, still dark, but less thick, less strong. It's a wonderful beer to have in autumn, which you are to go going into in your country. in so many. it's it's well-worth that, that was 19,600 SATs, which is an awful lot of sites sent through Curio caster. Thank you, Dave, for that, I will, send them to Sam at some point

Sam:

being a wine importer is the only thing I do, James. So importing why'd. I do understand. Oh, look at what a portrait

James:

is, but when I'm next allowed to travel to the UK, then I will introduce you to a Porter. One of the best porters that you can get is from a Sam Smiths pub Taddy Porter. It's called it's very good. And I would heartily recommend that more boost to Graham's drab. Scott says, yay, Martin, and then hashtag go podcasting. Now there's a little, there's a little jingle that normally goes with this, which goes, go podcast. But we don't have that drink aisle 16,000 sets. That's a lot. He then sent another one 16,400 SATs saying boost, which is very good. Drab. Thank you so much, Mary Oscar from fountain using the new Boostgram feature in fountains has another great episode. Thanks, James and Sam C calling you in the right name. Which is a lovely thing. And have you any idea what the last one is all about?

Sam:

Nick? Totally agree with your point? no, but thanks for the SATs, Nick, 495.

James:

Yeah. So I totally agree with my point too. So thank you for the 495 sets sent through fountain. I have a feeling that's Nick who's in charge of phones. Or maybe not, maybe it's just a different neck.

Sam:

we'll find out cause we've got Oscar coming on to the show in a couple of weeks

James:

time. So if you want to get a message through to booster Graham corner, hit the boost button and send us a message. And if you don't have a boost button in your podcast app, get a better1@newpodcastapps.com. And just in case you're keeping count of all of this so far. We have earned from this podcast 298,299 SATs. That's about 132 us dollars. it's, it's still small beans in the great scheme of things, but that's still rather a lot more than I was expecting. I think this is exciting. Personally, I like having booster grams. I'm looking forward to being able to reply to them. I'm looking forward to being able to know exactly how many sets people thought that they were giving us, because of course it's, we're seeing numbers, which are after some of the costs, but, what a wonderful thing. yes, it's a very good thing as opposed to yes.

Sam:

It's all part of Dave and Adam's value for value. If you want to find out more. Yes. Right now, too. Boosting your audience, Evo terrorists, trying a system to boost the listening audience of his podcast. Pontifications, it's trying to reach 10,000 listeners and he calling Tana Campbell's bluff basically. Cause he's going to spend $5 a day on Facebook ads. And according to Tada, if you do that, you'll get a sizeable order. Isn't that just 1 0 1 marketing.

James:

it is one-on-one marketing in a way. So Tana is a very outspoken podcast consultant and he is absolutely convinced that spending $5 a day on Facebook ads, you can get 10,000 new listeners in just a year. I think that's certainly a point of view. Evo is very clear in that he says, I don't think it'll work. but he's giving the $5 a day to Tana anyway. And I think Tana is probably regretting, tweeting and blogging about this particular thing. But anyway, it will be really interesting to watch what happens there. Tanner is already saying that I don't promise the audience size. 10,000, but I promise that it's significantly higher than the existing audience size and he's a bit derisive of iVOS podcasts. So I think there's a bunch of things that we can learn from this. And I think it'll be really interesting watching. Wow.

Sam:

If it works for Eva, we could always join in con cashing. Our SATs take our $132 and we get 26 days of

James:

Facebook ads indeed. And maybe we should reinvest into the company. Not that there is a company. Maybe we should reinvest into the partnership and see what we can do there. Yeah.

Sam:

I don't think so. I'd rather have the Porter bay, if you don't mind.

James:

even though you don't know what it is.

Sam:

it sounds better than wasting the $5 a day on Facebook as certain.

James:

Yeah.

Sam:

James. So what else has happened for you in pod

James:

land this week? so I was on the panel town podcast recorded for it last Friday morning. which was great fun. Looking forward to that podcast when it comes out, LZ D Flinor the third Vermeer. Pod town, recorded that was great. Fun, really enjoyed doing that. It's the first podcast that I've been on, where you are asked random trivia questions, which I didn't do very well with. but your eyes, random trivia questions and all kinds of things have very much enjoyed doing that. Watch out for the pod town podcast, when that comes out. And I was also on another podcast this week, which again is going to come out, soon. Or that podcast was the mosaic life podcast, which was great. Trey Kaufman, interviewed me a couple of days ago that is coming out, towards the end of August. So again, worthwhile having look at that. So very much enjoyed taking part on these shows. They're very different. So you, Sam are talking to lots of footballers for the old spice boys. Are you doing any other exciting.

Sam:

no, I think I've got my head down with that one. Oh, obviously I'm going to be trying to push the YouTube live today and just see how that whole work thing works for us. but we have got Gary line acre as he was once called by Mike Shannon, if that means anything to anyone. so Gary Lineker is the BBC's highest paid. Presenter he's played, I think 4 million pounds a year. he's decided that he's going to Jack it all in and go around the world with his sons for a year or something. but he's coming on the podcast in a couple of weeks time. So I'm looking

James:

forward to that one. Very nice. He also sells crisps in the UK for a company called walkers, which is the same company as In the U S and Smith's in Australia. So there you go. Crisp trivia or indeed chip trivia. Of course, if you're in the us or in Australia. so there you go, language trivia, and that's it for this week. Come back to Portland next time. Follow us in your podcast app or we're at www dot Podland dot news on the web are

Sam:

about eight. eventually. Now, if you have any comments or questions or you'd like to talk about stuff on this show, then contact us at Podland news on Twitter,

James:

or they send a supposed to Graham. And if you want daily news, you should get pod news, the newsletters free of pod news.net. The podcast is in your podcast app. And that's where you'll find all the links for all the stories we've mentioned this week. And of course, don't forget if you'd liked Brian Barletta earlier. Don't forget. Ascribe to him too. He's at sounds profitable.com.

Sam:

Our music is from jingles and we are hosted and sponsored by bus sprout and Riverside FN. If you've enjoyed this, please tell your friends about Portland and we'll see you all in potluck next week. Keep listening.